Storm Thorgerson

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order : 230 £

Official price : 395 €


Storm Thorgerson 28/02/1944 - 18/04/2013

I want to represent music,” states Storm Thorgerson with conviction. The British designer devoted his life to this personal representation, from the founding of the Hipgnosis collective for graphic design (with his accomplice Aubrey Powell) back in 1968, until he died on April 18 2013 at the age of 69.

 

We met each other when we were young. We would gather at Sheep's Green, a spot by the river in Cambridge, and Storm would always be there holding forth, making the most noise, bursting with ideas and enthusiasm. Nothing has ever really changed. He has been a constant force in my life, both at work and in private, a shoulder to cry on and a great friend. The artworks that he created for Pink Floyd from 1968 to the present day have been an inseparable part of our work. I will miss him.” DAVID GILMOUR


 

Storm Thorgerson pulled out all the stops in designing album covers for some of rock's greatest-ever bands (Pink Floyd, of course, but also Led Zeppelin, the Genesis of Peter Gabriel, Black Sabbath and, more recently, Muse). He was capable of putting 700 hospital beds on a beach in Devon (for Pink Floyd's album “A Momentary Lapse of Reason”), or have a cow simply plonked onto a field (“Atom Heart Mother”). Storm epitomised the multi-talented genius with breathtaking technique and dreamlike inventiveness. His pictures tapped into our unconscience by creating sophisticated scenarios or geometric shapes set against a black backdrop. And history has underlined the prescience of his works: his album sleeves have not only set the standard over the four decades of their existence, but the subliminal messages they convey continue to have a resounding contemporary impact.



This unique artiste, known for his generosity and foresight, has stamped his name into the annals of rock 'n' roll. As the Britain's quality broadsheet, The Guardian, put it recently, Thorgerson was simply “the world's greatest record sleeve designer”. And, naturally, he was much more than that.